Category Archives: Work

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Electroporation
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Why Electroporation?

Why electroporation? The reason is that electroporation is the most popular, most versatile, and most efficient transfection and transformation method available, for gene expression, in the widest variety of cell types.

In 1928, British medical officer Frederick Griffith conducted a series of classic experiments, with colonies of rough and smooth-coated Streptococcus pneumonia

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Drug Discovery & Development
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Electroporation Key to Skin Cancer Treatment

One in five individuals is likely to suffer from skin cancer at some point in their lives, and the numbers are steadily increasing. Despite advances that have been made in sunscreen technology and growing public awareness of the need for sunscreen, data that were reported in Dermatology Times found that the average U.S. lifetime risk of invasive melanoma has increased from 1 in 600 in 1960 to 1 in 50 in 2008. As baby boomers grow older, there is an added risk that skin cancer and other sold tumor cancers will loom larger in their lives.

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130311 Academic Lab
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Building Relationships Between Biotech Corporations and Academia

I believe that integrating academic institutions with the research and development pipeline – and having access to their facilities and research potential – to be of major importance. With the foundation of the biotech industry situated in California and along the West Coast, the location offers an ideal pocket of innovation and growth, within the life science community. The areas of major consideration are the Bay Area, San Diego, and Seattle. These areas not only offer large, committed life science groups and thriving biotech companies and economies but also some of the best educational institutions in North America if not the world, when you look at the life sciences.

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Western Pennsylvania Hospital News
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A New Opening in the Fight Against Solid Tumors

One in five people will suffer from skin cancer at some point in their lives, and the numbers are steadily increasing.  For example, despite advances in sunscreen technology and public awareness of the need for sunscreen, data that was recently reported in Dermatology Times reflects an increase in the average U.S. lifetime risk of one type of skin cancer—invasive melanoma—from 1/600 in 1960 to 1/50 in 2008.  As U.S. baby-boomers grow older, there is an added risk that skin cancer and other sold tumor cancers will loom larger in their lives.  Better treatments that are cost effective are therefore a high priority for the healthcare community to treat this expanding disease.

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